Unite’s consultative ballot of NHS members on the 2015/16 pay offer in now OPEN

http://www.unitetheunion.org/how-we-help/list-of-sectors/healthsector/healthsectorcampaigns/nhs-workers-deserve-a-pay-rise/

NHS-Kevin-Maguire-cartoon

Ballot opens on 6 February 2015 and closes on 27 February 2015

Now you decide – after years of refusing to negotiate with the unions on fair NHS pay, your industrial action has forced the government to get around the table and talk. All health unions, including Unite have agreed to put the new offer to you, our members, to decide in a consultative ballot.

Your stand has led to some improvements on pay for 2015/16 but has not delivered all that we wanted. And NO deal was reached on the 2014/15 imposed pay changes.

CHECK OUT THE FAQs ABOUT THE PAY OFFER.

What do I need to do?

Vote and return your ballot paper by the Friday 27 February deadline.

Your ballot paper will arrive by post – make sure you get a say. Return your ballot paper by Friday 27 February.  Your ballot pack contains a letter outlining the government’s pay offer. Please read this carefully before you decide.

Read details of the pay offer here: Letter to Unite NHS members

If we reject this offer when will the next strike dates be?

The next strike date would be on the 13th March 2015

What has happened to the strike planned for the 29 February 2015?

This date has been postponed until the 13th March 2015 to allow all unions to fully consult on the new offer

What happens if I haven’t received a ballot paper? 

If you have not received a ballot paper by Friday 13 February 2015, please contact the

Unite Health team here giving your full name, address and membership number and using the heading ‘NHS Ballot Paper.’

NHS pay dispute

NHS workers in England are set to take strike action for the third time in a dispute with the government over pay. Scroll down to see the map of where strike action is taking place.

In October Unite members working in the NHS along with colleagues from 10 leading health unions took strike action for the first time in more than 30 years over pay. Followed by a second walkout in November. (check out Unite’s picture gallery below)

What is the issue?

The government still isn’t listening –the real value of pay in the NHS has fallen by a staggering 15% over the last five years.  The government’s decision to deny 60 per cent of NHS staff a modest 1% consolidated cost of living pay increase this year, ignoring the recommendation of the independent pay review body (PRB) – the first time a government has done so – sparked the first walkout by NHS staff over pay in more than 30 years.

What can I do?

If you work in the NHS in England you need to take part in the strike. Speak to your rep and colleagues. Help us get as many NHS workers out on the picket lines on Thursday 29 January as possible. It’s only by standing together that we can get the government to listen.

You can also email your MP. It’s really important to get MPs to support your fight fight for fair NHS pay. The general election is a few months away. Email your MP to ask them to sign Unite’s 5 point NHS fair pay pledge. We’ve drafted the email, simply enter your postcode in the MP look up box below to get started.  See Unite’s MP NHS fair pay pledge . Visit your MP at their constituency surgery. You can request a supply of the MP postcard from your rep or regional office: MP postcard

Take action

Sign the RCM NHS fair pay petition to Jeremy Hunt 

Get on Twitter – share Unite’s series of infographics (see to your right) on Twitter and Facebook using the hashtag #NHSpay

Get ready to mobilise: Read Unite’s strike checklist to make sure you’re ready to strike

Keep sharing your stories – tell us how the government’s pay squeeze is affecting you and your family

How is the squeeze on your pay affecting you and your family? Share your story here.

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